Helping Families Keep Holy Week

Holy Week Formation

Educating and helping families to find ways to honor the week before Easter, known as Holy Week, is one of the many blessings church leaders can give.  It is the basis of our Christianity.  It is the greatest example of love in action. 

The week is full of drama, yet so much beauty.  It is a chance for families to dive deep into their faith.  It gives a way to talk about a God, who loves with a completeness.  Christmas means very little without the walk to Easter.

There are five ways that I have found very successful for families.  Some start at church, but move into the home.  They include: A Walk Through Holy Week, Holy Week Countdown Calendar, Holy Week Passports, Maundy Thursday Re-enactment, and Devotionals for Holy Week.

A Walk Through Holy Week

I host an event either on Palm Sunday or sometime the week before called “A Walk through Holy Week.”  Starting with Palm Sunday, we spend about 20-30 minutes on each day.  We read the Scripture, discuss what happens in the liturgy at the service, and make a symbol for that service (or build a Lego).  Ideas for “symbol” include making something for a countdown calendar (either paper or felt), creating a picture book with a description on the day for the congregation, or making a Lego to put on display.

Palm Sunday-Jesus Enters Jerusalem: Matthew 21:1-11; Mark 11:1-11; Luke 19: 28-40; John 12: 12-19

Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and why, talk through the Palm Sunday liturgy, read the Collect for the Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday, and then make a palm leaf cross (or Lego of Jesus’ triumphant entry.

Monday in Holy Week- Jesus Cleans House: Matthew 21:12-17; Mark 11:15-19; Luke 19:45-48; John 2:13-17. Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and why, talk through basic of Eucharist (part 1), read the collect for the day, and then add a “gold” coin to the calendar (or Lego of Jesus throwing out the money changers.)

Tuesday in Holy Week-Jesus Predicts His Death: Mark 8:31-38; Luke 18: 31-33; John 12: 20-30.  Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and why, talk through basic of Eucharist (part 2), read the collect for the day, and then add a heart with the Alpha-Omega Sign (or Jesus with his followers and them not understanding.)

Wednesday in Holy Week-Anointing of Jesus’ Feet: Matthew 26: 6-13; Mark 14: 3-9; Luke 7: 36-50; John 12: 1-11.  Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and why, talk through basic Eucharist (part 3), read the collect of the day, and then add a foot print or cut out of a foot (or Lego of Jesus getting feet washed.)

Maundy Thursday-Dinner in Upper Room and a New Commandment:  Matthew 26: 14-39; Mark 14: 22-25; Luke 22: 1-27; John 13: 1-38.  Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and why, talk about the Maundy Thursday Service (foot washing, stripping of altar) and remind them of our communion.  Read the Collect for Maundy Thursday.  Add a chalice and wafer or symbol of the bread and wine (or Lego of the Last Supper.)

Good Friday-The Crucifixion: Matthew 27: 32-66; Mark 15: 21-47; Luke 23: 26-56; John 19: 16-42.  Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and why, (using the Stations of the Cross works very well), talk about the Good Friday Service, read the Collect for Good Friday, and add a cross (or build a Lego of the crucifixion.)

Holy Saturday/Easter Vigil-The Burial of Jesus…We Wait: Matthew 27: 57-66; John 19: 38-42.  Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and what everyone was feeling, talk about the Easter Vigil Service, read the Collect for Holy Saturday, and add a “tomb” or rock (or Lego of the tomb and waiting.)

Easter-The Resurrection: He is Risen! Matthew 28:1-10; Mark 16: 1-12; Luke 24: 1-12; John 20: 1-10.  Read or tell the story, wonder what happened and why, talk about the Easter Service, read the collect for Easter, and add an Easter lily with “He is Risen!” (or make a Lego of the Empty tomb.)

This can be very time consuming and so may be divided by days and done over the whole of Lent or only pick certain days to talk about.  It is worth the time commitment as it gives a deep understanding and expectation to Holy Week.  Families take their countdown calendar of Holy Week home and when Holy Week comes, they put up a symbol each day and are reminded of the scripture.  More importantly, it opens a conversation about the life, death and resurrection of Jesus.

Holy Week Countdown Calendar

 Holy Week Countdown Calendar is very similar to the Walk Through Holy Week, but is home based.  It is a “home kit” for Holy Week. It can be done in several forms.  The first form is a paper calendar with information about each day including scripture verse, prayer, and devotion. 

Another form is a booklet, with each day being a page.  The page would include Scripture, devotion, collect of the day, discussion questions, and an activity the family could choose to do.

A Child’s Countdown Calendar would be made of links of paper leading to a picture of an Easter Morning.  Each link would include a brief story and a prayer.

A Symbol Calendar is made of felt or wide ribbon.  The symbols mentioned in “Walk Through Holy Week” are put on and off using Velcro.  A booklet with the scripture, devotion, collect of the day, and discussion questions is included with it.

Holy Week Passports

Holy Week Passports quickly became a favorite of children and adults!  We had families who attended a Holy Week Service just to get their sticker. 

I created the passports in house.  I wrote what each day meant, anything special happening in the Service and gave a place for a sticker.  For the cover, I used light purple thick paper.  We printed in house.  I designed the stickers using Avery Circular Stickers and the template from their website.

Let’s travel with Jesus and his friends for Holy Week. Travelers need to carry a passport when they travel to exciting places—and this booklet is your passport for Holy Week.

On or before Palm Sunday, find a special place to keep your passport. It could be on the table beside your bed, or even in your car. Every day in Holy Week, read the Bible passage, either with a printed Bible or on www.biblegateway.com.  Then explore the question on each page and pray the Lord’s Prayer. Afterwards, award yourself with the passport sticker for that day!  If you would like to share a picture of your passport as it fills up, please post it to our Facebook page.

The Lord’s Prayer:

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy Name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

Each day is a separate page.  Children love it if you add a picture page like a real passport.

Maundy Thursday

Children love to be involved in the movement of this service.  The focus is bringing the story of the Passover and for Jesus, the last meal with his friends to life.  Using a low table, the evening includes candles, different types of bread, different types of grapes, sample of the meal, washing feet supplies, and pillows to sit on.

We gather outside the room and I send two children ahead to check to see if the room is ready.  The low table is covered with a beige table cover and surrounded with pillows.  Candles (I use battery operated) fill the room and are the only light. 

We all enter the room and sit around the table.  I tell them the story of how the Passover came to be.  Then I move on to the story of Jesus and the importance of this feast day to him.  I describe what it could have been like.  I tell them Jesus’ words about the bread and wine.  We talk about our communion.  We then pass different types of bread around, tasting a little from each, choosing the favorites and taste differences.  We then talk about how wine is made and pass around the different grapes.  Then we hear about the New Commandment.  We talk about What Jesus was saying and how different it would be for his followers to hear it.  We discuss what it means for us.  We then move from the table and each is asked if they would like to have their feet washed and/or wash someone’s feet.  Once all, who wish to participate, are done.  We sit in a circle and discuss what it felt to wash another ‘s feet and to get our feet washed. 

We then talk about the betrayal and the friends present.  The children generally have lots of questions. / We sit in silence to feel a little of what the evening held for Jesus.

We move into the garden.  We sit in a circle and I tell them about Jesus going to the garden to pray.  We talk of how his friends fell asleep.  We wonder what everyone felt.  We pray.  We talk about Jesus and his time in the garden.  We talk about things we are afraid of. 

Next, we talk about what is going to happen during the service.  I mention communion and to listen to the words remembering this night.  I invite them to sit in the front pews with me after they have had communion with their family to watch the stripping of the altar.  I answer their questions about that. 

We talk about sadness.  We talk about hopelessness.  We talk about darkness.  I remind them that Easter is coming and this is not the end, but we have to sit in this moment before we can move into Easter.

The children are very engaged when we return to the sanctuary for the remainder of the service.   When the children join me to watch the stripping of the altar, they are in awe and point out many things.  I allow them to tell me what they are seeing and ask questions.  I have a “splash zone” around the first few pews so that those who sit there know it may be a little noisy.

Children of all ages learn from this service.  I, also, learn from the children as they respond, question, and discuss the events of the evening.

We leave the church in silence, knowing we still have Good Friday, but Easter is coming; God will not leave us alone in the dark.

Holy Week Devotionals

I have worked with children, with youth, and with adults to create a week-long devotional for Holy Week.  The devotionals are available starting on Palm Sunday.  The whole congregation loves getting them and following along.  I have even illustrated them with pictures based on what the person or class has written. 

The children loved doing this as a Wednesday evening project.  We used all of Lent to create the booklet. Each class, we would talk about scripture, what we think we should get out of it.  How we can do better or differently.  How can we love Jesus?  Is there anything we want to say to our church family? Then we write a prayer to go with it.

Devotionals written by those in our church family mean something more to us than one we purchase.  They take a little planning, but what often comes from it is beautiful.

Helping Families Keep Lent: Lent Challenges

Using Lent as a Time to Grow

Lent Challenges

Lent Challenges are a way to learn new practices and focus on “doing something” instead of “giving up something.”  Based on the Ash Wednesday Prayer from the Book of Common Prayer to have a “Holy Lent”, these challenges are designed to discover and try new things.  Each time a task is completed, the child gets a sticker or other type reward on a bulletin board.  The child, also, gets a matching sticker to wear.  Once a challenge is completed, the child demonstrates or shows me.

I encourage families to do the challenge together and explore them together.  Once all the challenges are completed, the child gets an invitation to a pizza party with me after Easter.

This can be done as a family-at-home challenge or done as a group class project on a week-night with other children.

Lent week One: Prayer

               An explanation of what it is and why do it (if done at home, then an informational sheet.)

               Obvious ways

  • Meals
    • Start & Close of Day
    • Book of Common Prayer
    • When worried about something

Other Ways to Pray

  • Praying while coloring
    • Praying using a labyrinth or object
    • Praying in a visual way

Writing a prayer-child writes prayer to be used throughout week.

Choose a prayer practice

Do it

Lent week Two: Community Service

               An explanation of Baptismal Covenant and importance of helping others (if done at home, then

               Informational sheet.)

               Obvious ways

  • Helping those closest to you
    • Helping the earth
    • Moving Outward
    • County, State
    • Country
    • World

Our project: choosing a project-

  • Who helps
    • What we will do

               Do project

Lent week three: Study and Learning

What is it (studying scripture)

Why do it?

  • To know, get help, understand
    • To be able to interpret for ourselves
    • To gain and grow in wisdom & faith
    • To connect to God, Christianity, each other
    • For strength, comfort, etc.

Obvious ways

  • History of Bible Reading-OT, NT
    • Families read together
    • Different translations
    • Media presentations

Other Ways to Read and study

  • Devotionals
    • With others, Lectio or other out-loud methods.
    • Beginning to end
    • Picking a certain Book or Chapter of the Holy Bible.

Choose one.  Make a picture book for children showing what you have read or write a meditation on what you did for the week.

Lent week Four: Almsgiving

               What is it and Why do it? (If sending home, send home informational sheet).

Obvious ways to raise money to give for a child

  • Earning money
    • Chores, Allowance
    • Selling items a baked goods
    • Giving up a food or other item and putting that money towards almsgiving.

               Organizations-many different ways to give to charity

  • The Church
  • Episcopal Relief and Development

               Pick a project and writing a plan paying for & set goal.  Then do it.

Lent Week Five: Personal Practices

               How do you live out your faith?

What does our Baptismal Covenant say?

               Review the Book of Common Prayer.

               Healthy balance

  • Media
  • Friends
  • School
  • Church
  • Faith practices

Other Ways

  • Goals for one year, five years
    • Write letter to self

Writing a mission/goal statement

Choose ways to help achieve

Do it.

Lent Challenges for Families & Children: A Fun Way to Grow During Lent

Lent Challenges

Lent Challenges are a way to learn new practices and focus on “doing something” instead of “giving up something.”  Based on the Ash Wednesday Prayer from the Book of Common Prayer to have a “Holy Lent”, these challenges are designed to discover and try new things.  Each time a task is completed, the child gets a sticker or other type reward on a bulletin board.  The child, also, gets a matching sticker to wear.  Once a challenge is completed, the child demonstrates or shows me.

I encourage families to do the challenge together and explore them together.  Once all the challenges are completed, the child gets an invitation to a pizza party with me after Easter.

This can be done as a family-at-home challenge or done as a group class project on a week-night with other children.

Lent week One: Prayer

               An explanation of what it is and why do it (if done at home, then an informational sheet.)

               Obvious ways

  • Meals
    • Start & Close of Day
    • Book of Common Prayer
    • When worried about something

Other Ways to Pray

  • Praying while coloring
    • Praying using a labyrinth or object
    • Praying in a visual way

Writing a prayer-child writes prayer to be used throughout week.

Choose a prayer practice

Do it

Lent week Two: Community Service

               An explanation of Baptismal Covenant and importance of helping others (if done at home, then

               Informational sheet.)

               Obvious ways

  • Helping those closest to you
    • Helping the earth
    • Moving Outward
    • County, State
    • Country
    • World

Our project: choosing a project-

  • Who helps
    • What we will do

               Do project

Lent week three: Study and Learning

What is it (studying scripture)

Why do it?

  • To know, get help, understand
    • To be able to interpret for ourselves
    • To gain and grow in wisdom & faith
    • To connect to God, Christianity, each other
    • For strength, comfort, etc.

Obvious ways

  • History of Bible Reading-OT, NT
    • Families read together
    • Different translations
    • Media presentations

Other Ways to Read and study

  • Devotionals
    • With others, Lectio or other out-loud methods.
    • Beginning to end
    • Picking a certain Book or Chapter of the Holy Bible.

Choose one.  Make a picture book for children showing what you have read or write a meditation on what you did for the week.

Lent week Four: Almsgiving

               What is it and Why do it? (If sending home, send home informational sheet).

Obvious ways to raise money to give for a child

  • Earning money
    • Chores, Allowance
    • Selling items a baked goods
    • Giving up a food or other item and putting that money towards almsgiving.

               Organizations-many different ways to give to charity

  • The Church
  • Episcopal Relief and Development

               Pick a project and writing a plan paying for & set goal.  Then do it.

Lent Week Five: Personal Practices

               How do you live out your faith?

What does our Baptismal Covenant say?

               Review the Book of Common Prayer.

               Healthy balance

  • Media
  • Friends
  • School
  • Church
  • Faith practices

Other Ways

  • Goals for one year, five years
    • Write letter to self

Writing a mission/goal statement

Choose ways to help achieve

Do it.

Using the Jesus Doll & Kit for Lent

Jesus Doll makes children smile


Lent is a time to focus on our relationships with God and each other. One bridge to the Sunday Morning “box” and to one’s home is with a Jesus Doll.  It helps families become rooted in Jesus in an easy way. After adding a home kit, it has been a wonderful tool to tie our parish and faith to a family’s home life.  Children have loved their turn with the doll and kit.  Parents love having a format to discuss Jesus and faith. One mother told me that her family had never discussed Jesus so much!

The family gets the Jesus Doll and Home kit on Sunday morning and return it the following Sunday.  I send an email during the week to let the coming family know their turn with the doll and kit will start the coming Sunday.  I, also, send an email to the family who has the doll, asking them to send pictures and reminding them to bring it with them on Sunday. We have a large parish, so generally I stick to our Kindergarten Class, but all children love the opportunity to take “Jesus” into their home.

The photographs returned are full of smiles as the child(ren) take Jesus on their different adventures.  Jesus has visited preschool classes, parks, parties, and zoos while with the children.  Jesus, also, joins the family at dinner and bedtime. The books (made from a photo service), are cherished. I title it “Jesus Came to our Homes” and the year. I put the photos in story content.

Parents receive a letter in the kit:

    This is your week with St. Paul’s Jesus Doll and bag.  Enclosed in the bag, you will find a folder with an activity sheet for each child in your family as soon as Jesus comes home and then an activity sheet when Jesus is ready to come back to church.  Please, return the sheets with the doll and book in the bag.  They will be used to make a display and a book.

       The bag, also, contains the book If Jesus Came to My House.  Please read this with your child and use it throughout your time with the Jesus doll as a time to talk about Jesus in our homes and in our lives.

       Please email a photo of your child(ren) with the Jesus Doll and one photo of Jesus doing an activity with your family.  These with the words will be put into a Shutterfly book that will travel with the doll in the future.  Copies will be available for purchase if you would like your own.    

       Included in this folder is a Parent Insights Page.  Please write anything you would like to share about this experience for your family. 

      Please, return the doll and the bag with all the contents the next time you come to the church.  The doll and bag with new sheets will be passed on to the next family.

     Any discussion questions you have with your children that you would like to pass on, please let Lauren know and those will be compiled to travel with the doll.

Enjoy your visit with Jesus at your home and I hope you find ways to include Jesus in all your activities even beyond the doll’s visit.

Additionally, each kit contains

  • Two Activity Sheets for each child: one sheet asks the child to write or draw what they would like to do with Jesus during the coming week and the other is their favorite times with Jesus (write or draw) for child to return and then are displayed.
  • Insight Page for parents to return
  • Book: If Jesus Came to My House
  • Jesus Doll
  • Photo book from previous years

The Jesus Doll and Home Kit was such a success, that I purchased a second Jesus Doll and book. This one goes to our school for classes to use. Jesus, also, attends our parish events. I get various pictures of Jesus with parishioners or “doing” some of our regular activities.

Click on any of the highlighted items to see what I used.  Any items purchased through this link helps to fund this site.

Helping Families Keep the Season of Lent

Lent-in-a-Bag 2020

This church season begins with Ash Wednesday and ends with the Easter Triduum (Maundy Thursday through Easter Day) and lasts forty days, plus the Sundays.  Lent is an important time in the church and for our families.  It was has been a time for preparation for Easter, which included baptism of converts to the faith and reconciliation of those who either left the church or of sinners who had been publicly excommunicated from the church.  It is a time to get ready to enter into the mystery of Easter.  Lent, historically, is a time of fasting, penitence, almsgiving (charity work), prayer and study for those being baptized, reconciled, or those wishing to grow closer to God.  Currently, we are asked to use Lent as a time for personal and collective transformations.  We look truthfully at ourselves and make changes. 

We see two major scripture stories that use the forty days as a time of great change.  The children of Israel, were led out of bondage into freedom, but ended up spending time in the wilderness to prepare for their promised land.  Jesus went into the wilderness for forty days to prepare for his ministry.  As these stories represent, we can use Lent to break our bonds, make new choices and begin a new direction for hearts and lives.

When most people think of Lent, they think of giving up a food item for six weeks.  I like to give families a new practice and a time to focus on their relationship with God and each other.  Giving them the tools for spiritual practices and discussions during this time is important.  Some of the offerings I give families are Lent Home Kits, Lent Challenges, Jesus Doll and Home Kit, Ways to Pray and Give, and Devotionals. 

Holy Week will be covered in Another blog.

Lent Home Kits- Lent-in-a-Bag is one of the most popular of our take home activities.  The bags are handed out on the first Sunday of Lent (one per family).  The bag contains six objects and devotions.  I place the object in a snack size back and staple the devotion to the bag.  I, also, put a booklet with all the Bible reading for each devotion.  I find that busy families will not take the time to go and get a Bible, so this guarantees that scripture will be read.  Each week, after dinner or before bedtime, the family gathers together.  One object with devotion is bulled from the Lent-in-a-Bag.  Someone reads the devotion and accompanying scripture.  There is a discussion and prayer said.  It does not take long, but families are so excited, especially the children, it is hard to get them to wait a week in-between. 

Buying items in bulk helps keep the cost down to a little over $1 a bag.

Each year, I choose a different theme.  In 2019, I did “Journey into the Wilderness” with each scripture and devotion being about someone who from scripture who had to go to the wilderness or a dark time before they did their work. 

For 2020, the theme was “Praying with Jesus”.  Each scripture and devotion is about one of the times Jesus used prayer before a major act or immediately after: Before his ministry started, the wilderness (the object was a rock), before choosing the 12 apostles (the object was a star), before the Transfiguration (the object was a battery-operated tea candle), and before he was arrested (the object was a cross).  After he fed the 5000 (the object was a fish).  He taught how to pray (the object is a scroll with the Lord’s Prayer).

Examples of devotions:

Before choosing his 12 apostles, Jesus went to pray.  He continued in prayer all night.  Read Luke 6:12-16.  Why do you think he prayed before choosing the 12?  Why pray all night?  When do you pray?  What if before major choices, we prayed, do you think it would make a difference?  We think of stars as important and even call some people a star.  What if we made Jesus our star this Lent.  What would that look like?  As you pass around the star, name one thing about Jesus that you admire.  Say a prayer asking Jesus to be your star.

Before Jesus’ transfiguration, Jesus took a few of his disciples and went up on the mountain to pray.  Read Luke 9: 28-36.  Jesus became filled with light and glowed, as well as, spoke to two prophets from a long time ago.  When we are in darkness, we use light to help us see.  What else do we use light for?  When are times that you were afraid and a light made you feel better?  Turn on the candle.  We depend on light.  What if we relied on Jesus, like we relied on light?  As you pass the candle, say a prayer and each name one place in your life that you will include Jesus as the center (the light.)

After Jesus feeds a large crowd, Jesus sends his friends on and goes to pray.  He had tried to spend time in prayer before the feeding, but had compassion on the crowd.  Read Matthew 14: 13-23.  Just as Jesus fed the crowd food, prayer feeds our souls.  It helps us connect with God.  What are some things that feed you (helps you feel excited and full of energy?)  When you are tired, what feeds you (helps you to feel better?)  What is a way you can connect to God?  Think of a short sentence that you could use to pray continuously to God (i.e. God be with me.)  Fish need care.  Our souls need care.  Pass around the fish and say your short sentence as a prayer.  When the last one has said their prayer, say the Lord’s Prayer together.

Surprisingly, Jesus does not tell his disciples about prayer; he just does it.  One, finally, asks Jesus to teach them how to pray.  Read Luke 11: 10-8.  This is what we call the Lord’s Prayer.  It is the only prayer Jesus taught us.  He starts by acknowledging God’s will is the most important then asks for the things we need to survive and moves into asking forgiveness for our sins (trespasses), but on the condition that we forgive others.  Then we ask for guidance when we are faced with a difficult choice or situation.  When do you pray the Lord’s Prayer?  What is your favorite part?  Are there other prayers you could pray that ask for the same thing?  Unroll the scroll.  Where is someplace you could place the scroll this week to remind all who see it to pray the Lord’s Prayer or a similar prayer?  Say the Lord’s Prayer together and put the scroll in a place to remind each family member to say the prayer when they see it.

Before Easter, there was Good Friday, the crucifixion.  Before the crucifixion, there was the arrest of Jesus.  Before the arrest of Jesus, Jesus goes to pray.  He knows what is to come and requires the strength and connection that comes with prayer.  He, also, asks his friends to come and pray with him, but they keep falling asleep.  Read Mark 14: 32-41.  I wonder how things seem, things we are very afraid to face or do, if we went to prayer for strength and connection?  When do you like to pray alone?  When do you like praying in a group?  When do you like praying in a community?  What do you like about each?  What do you not like about each?  As you pass around the cross, name one emotion Jesus was probably feeling.  When everyone has had a turn, say a prayer asking God to be with you when you feel those feelings.  Sit in quiet with your eyes closed, letting God’s presence be with you.

Before starting his ministry, Jesus went into the wilderness for 40 days.  To prepare for his ministry, Jesus prayed.  Read Matthew 4:6-11. 

While in the wilderness, Jesus was invited to transform stone into bread.  Jesus knew he was not called to do this by God.  Perhaps prayer helped him to know what he was called to do.  Might there be a stony place in you that needs changing?  Some attitude or habit that, with a little attention, might even become a gift for you and others?  When you are angry or sad, it may feel like your heart has become a rock.  How does that feel?  How can you help someone who has a “rock” in their heart?  When we are hungry or hurting it can be hard to do the right thing.  How can we remember to choose to do the right thing?  Pass around the rock. Using a permanent marker, write a word that everyone can pray to help you when you feel like you are in a rocky place.

Click here to see Lent in a Bag 2019

Lent in a Bag: Journey in the Wilderness

Lent in a Bag ready to go.

Developing a way for families to worship, discuss, and bring Lent into their homes without the traditional fasting (or in addition to giving up a food item) is one of the ways we strengthen the bridge between the church and home.

Lent in a Bag is handed out to all families with children on the first Sunday of Lent. Each year, I have a different theme with story items. This is to keep things interesting. For this year, the theme is Journey into the Wilderness. I am focusing on all the Bible stories about people who went into the desert and then came out to do their ministry.

Each week the family sits around the table and pulls one object out of the bag. Attached to each object is a Bible story, a short write up with discussion questions. After listening to the story, eachfamily member passes around the object and answers the questions. The session ends in prayer.

This is very popular and many of our families are excited to share Lent in a Bag with others outside of our church family!

Here are the stories and the items I used for this year:

Jesus- after his baptism, he goes into the wilderness (Matthew 4, Mark 1 or Luke 4) The object is a small bag of sand.

Jesus- in wildnerness tempted rocks to bread (Matthew 4: 1-10). The object is a rock.

Moses leaves Egypt to shepherd int he wilderness (Exodus 2: 11-25). The object is minature sheep.

Moses and the Israelites wander in the dessert (Exodus 32). The object is gold.

John the Baptist (Mark 1: 1-13). The object is a clam shell.

Ezekiel-having a heart for God (Ezekiel 36:24 – 37:14). The object is a heart.

Abraham and Sarah (Genesis 18-25 summarized). The object is a baby.

With the theme of into the wilderness as a precusor to ministry, I am hoping it encourages each person to think about their ministry. In the future, if they are driven “into the wilderness” in their lives, then to know an exciting ministry can be ahead in their lives too.

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